criticism


No one likes it when people steal an idea and republish it. In the world of blogging, a’via’ link at the bottom of a post has become the norm for crediting sources. However, this phenomena is getting way out of control and many people link to the latest source in a long chain rather than the original. I found out first hand just how bad things had gotten when I started trying to track the actual source of an article today, only to be plunged into a seemingly endless list of links.

spy-pen.jpg

It all started with a blurb on EcoGeek about a 007 Solar Pen Camera spying device. I wanted to submit the link to Digg then noticed their blurb was via TreeHugger, which in turn added two new links: ChinaVision and Dvice. The latter link traced to UberGizmo, which linked to UberReview that in turn linked to 7Gadgets (an appropriate 7th link in the ongoing chain). Most of these sites didn’t link to the ChinaVision (original) site, and only one linked to 7Gadgets where this information apparently first hit the blogosphere.

The fact that this last source didn’t link another source doesn’t even mean, of course, that it is the last source in the chain. Maybe this is just where the chain got broken because one author didn’t cite his source. So where did this come from? Which one should you link to or submit to Digg? Who knows. What does this mean for the blogosphere? Is it natural and healthy sourcing or a sign of things getting out of control?

via allsux

Disclosure: I have sites hosted on Dreamhost.

Dreamhost had a severe outtage earlier today during peak traffic times, but declared it ‘resolved’ long before all of their sites came online. Comments continued to pour in from disgruntled users well after they made an announcement highlighting (as shown below) that everything was alright. Everything was not alright.

Network Slowness on Dreamhost

Now, I want to like Dreamhost, and most of the time I do. They pride themselves on being friendly and personable, and they are. You get a lot from Dreamhost for under 10 bucks a month. I can even understand the outtage.

That being said, if they are running at “95%” up then I think it’s reasonable to expect that my own sites won’t be 100% down. Also, if the situation is “resolved” then all customers should cease experiencing problems.

Dreamhost is not, as they say, such a nightmare most of the time. However, when nightmarish things happen, I believe their customers have the right to expect them to remain upfront about it. If their systems are mostly operational, then I would rather they spend time fixing the rest rather than updating their message to the equivalent of “mission accomplished.” That is all.